You are not alone, according to a new study. Even though people may be more careful in the sun after skin cancer, having had a malignancy still doesn’t convince everybody to take basic precautions like wearing hats or sunscreen, a recent U.S. study suggests.

Even with history of skin cancer, though, only 54 percent of people used sunscreen. That’s better than just 33 percent among people without a history of skin cancer, but still leaves a lot of people unprotected from sun damage.


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According to a new American Academy of Dermatology survey, 71 percent of 18- to 34-year-old women know that there is no such thing as a healthy tan, and 66 percent know that getting a base tan is not a healthy way to protect themselves from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. The survey also indicates that these women understand what’s at risk when they tan, as 98 percent know that skin cancer can be deadly.


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for your body’s vitamin D production, according to a new study in Brazil:

“Even people exposed to high levels of sunlight may be deficient in serum vitamin D because it is mainly induced by UV irradiation and synthesized in the skin”.


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